Website Plagiarism

While it may be flattering that so many of you seem to think that our website is worthy of copying, I’m getting a bit f*****g sick of having to ask ‘Network’ MEMBERS to remove OUR intellectual property from their websites.

The next ‘Network’ member that copies ANYTHING from our website will be charged £500 as a design fee (our standard charge) AND will be sued for their breach of our copyright if they don’t remove the material immediately.
 

Posted under Legal Issues

Posted by Alec at 6:00 pm, April 30, 2008

3 Comments so far

  1. Alec added on  May 1st, 2008 at 07:55

    “if someone copies part of your super duper web-site, and changes the wording slightly, it would be difficult to prove copywrite””if someone copies part of your super duper web-site, and changes the wording slightly, it would be difficult to prove copywrite”

    Rubbish, the duplication of a single image, unique paragraph or even a single unique sentence is enough to demonstrate to ‘a reasonable man’ that ‘in the balance of probability’ a breach of copyright has occured. That’s the only test required and it’s pretty simple to prove in cases like this.

    Using your website as an example – “We are dedicated to keeping our promise to you of safe, same day delivery anywhere in the UK. If exceptional circumstances should lead to a problem, we shall inform you at once and keep you updated until delivery is completed.” is clearly a fairly generic phrase and may or may not be derivative of something that appears on our website. However the identical phrase is used on at least two other couriers’ websites. One of the three of you undoubtedly owns the copyright of the page that the phrase is taken from and the other two are undoubtedly (unless permission has been given) in breach of the Copyright, Designs And Patents Act 1988. The only thing required to win a court case would be for the copyright owner to establish that they were the original owner of the material and that it has been reproduced without their consent.

    With all the fuss made on here about the ethics of the business – late payment, poaching etc – what are companies saying about themselves by using material stolen from other ‘Network’ members to promote their businesses?

    Rubbish, the duplication of a single image, unique paragraph or even a single unique sentence is enough to demonstrate to ‘a reasonable man’ that ‘in the balance of probability’ a breach of copyright has occured. That’s the only test required and it’s pretty simple to prove in cases like this.

    Using your website as an example – “We are dedicated to keeping our promise to you of safe, same day delivery anywhere in the UK. If exceptional circumstances should lead to a problem, we shall inform you at once and keep you updated until delivery is completed.” is clearly a fairly generic phrase and may or may not be derivative of something that appears on our website. However the identical phrase is used on at least two other couriers’ websites. One of the three of you undoubtedly owns the copyright of the page that the phrase is taken from and the other two are undoubtedly (unless permission has been given) in breach of the Copyright, Designs And Patents Act 1988. The only thing required to win a court case would be for the copyright owner to establish that they were the original owner of the material and that it has been reproduced without their consent.

    With all the fuss made on here about the ethics of the business – late payment, poaching etc – what are companies saying about themselves by using material stolen from other ‘Network’ members to promote their businesses?

  2. Alec added on  May 1st, 2008 at 08:49

    Of course it is. In exactly the same way as a book is copyright – try republishing Harry Potter as ‘Larry Potter’ using the same text and see how far you get.

  3. Alec added on  May 1st, 2008 at 08:53

    And you don’t have to ‘copyright’ anything, or display a copyright notice. The creator automatically owns the copyright unless they have agreed otherwise.

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